Episode 334 – Leap seconds break everything

Josh and Kurt talk about leap seconds. Every time there’s a leap second, things break. Facebook wants to get rid of them because they break computers, but Google found a clever way to keep leap seconds without breaking anything. Corner cases are hard, security is often just one huge corner case. There are lessons we can learn here.

Show Notes

Episode 333 – Open Source is unfair

Josh and Kurt talk about Microsoft creating a policy of not allowing anyone to charge for open source in their app store. This policy was walked back quickly, but it raises some questions about how fair or unfair open source really is. It’s mostly unfair to developers if you look at the big picture.

Show Notes

Episode 332 – PyPI: 2FA or not 2FA, that is the question

Josh and Kurt talk about PyPI mandating two factor authentication for the top 1% of projects. It feels like a simple idea, but it’s not when you start to think about it. What problems does 2FA solve? How common are these attacks? What are the second and third order effects of mandating 2FA? This episode should have something for everyone on all sides of this discussion to violently disagree with.

Show Notes

Episode 331 – GPG, but nothing makes sense

Josh and Kurt talk about their very silly GPG key management from the past. This is sadly a very true story that details how both Kurt and Josh protected their GPG keys. Josh’s setup is like something out of a very bad spy novel. It was very over the top for a key that really didn’t matter.

Show Notes

Episode 330 – The sliding scale of risk: seeing the forest for the trees

Josh and Kurt talk about the challenge of dealing with vulnerabilities at a large scale. We tend to treat every vulnerability equally when they are not equal at all. Some are trees we have to pay very close attention to, and some are part of a larger forest that can’t be treated as individual vulnerabilities. We often treat risk as a binary measurement instead of a sliding scale.

Show Notes

Episode 329 – Signing (What is it good for)

Josh and Kurt talk about what the actual purpose of signing artifacts is. This is one of those spaces where the chain of custody for signing content is a lot more complicated than it sometimes seems to be. Is delivering software over https just as good as using a detached signature? How did we end up here, what do we think the future looks like? This episode will have something for everyone to complain about!

Show Notes

Episode 328 – The Security of Jobs or Job Security

Josh and Kurt talk about the security of employees leaving jobs. Be it a voluntary departure or in the context of the current layoffs we see, what are the security implications of having to remove access for one or more people departing their job?

Show Notes

Episode 327 – The security of alert fatigue

Josh and Kurt talk about a funny GitHub reply that notified 400,000 people. It’s fun to laugh at this, but it’s an easy open to discussing alert fatigue and why it’s important to be very mindful of our communications.

Show Notes

Episode 326 – Big fat containers

Josh and Kurt talk about containers. There are a lot of opinions around what type of containers is best. Back when it all started there were only huge distro sized containers. Now we have a world with many different container types and sizes. Is one better?

Show Notes

Episode 325 – Is one open source maintainer enough?

Josh and Kurt talk about a recent OpenSSF issue that asks the question how many open source maintainers should a project have that’s “healthy”? Josh did some research that shows the overwhelming majority of packages have one maintainer. What does that mean?

Show Notes